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SLFLA

Month: May 2019

Know the Law. Know your Rights.

Generally, employees in California are entitled to a rest break and/or meal break when they work more than three and a half hours a day. Specifically, state law mandates a 10-minute rest break for every four hours worked in a day; and a 30-minute meal break if a shift is more than five hours. An additional 30-minute meal break is required by law if an employee works ten hours in a day.

There are some exceptions depending on the type of employee or industry, such as construction, commercial drivers, or utility workers. The vast majority of employees, however, are protected by state law and employers are violating your rights if you are not provided breaks according to the statute. If your employer is not providing you with mandated meal or rest breaks, you have the right to file a lawsuit and seek compensation.

California Labor Code 512(1)(a)

An employer shall not employ an employee for a work period of more than five hours per day without providing the employee with a meal period of not less than 30 minutes, except that if the total work period per day of the employee is no more than six hours, the meal period may be waived by mutual consent of both the employer and employee. An employer shall not employ an employee for a work period of more than 10 hours per day without providing the employee with a second meal period of not less than 30 minutes, except that if the total hours worked is no more than 12 hours, the second meal period may be waived by mutual consent of the employer and the employee only if the first meal period was not waived.

Employees may voluntarily waive meal breaks in certain circumstances. For example, if the shift is no more than six hours, the employee may waive the required meal break. An employee, however, may generally not waive the second mandated meal break required for a 10-hour shift if they waived the first meal break. The laws are often complicated, so employees should ask for clarification from a supervisor or human resources; as well as consult with an experienced employment attorney if there appears to be a pattern of violations.

Rest breaks are required by law for any shift lasting more than three and a half hours, and employees must be given a paid rest break every four hours or major fraction thereof. Employees may also voluntarily work during a rest break, but under no circumstances may the employer require you to work during your mandated breaks.

FREE CONSULTATION

Srourian Law Firm, with locations in Los Angeles, Westwood, Woodland Hills, and Orange County is experienced in all aspects of employment law including failure to provide meal or rest breaks and have aggressively represented employees in Los Angeles, Hollywood, Santa Monica, Orange, Irvine, Anaheim, Santa Ana, Newport Beach, Costa Mesa, Fullerton, Tustin, Mission Viejo, San Clemente, Garden Grove, Laguna Niguel, Brea, Fountain Valley, Aliso Viejo, Yorba Linda, Westminster, Laguna Hills, Cypress, and La Habra.

If you or someone you know suffered employment violations as an employee such as being denied meal and rest breaks in California, you may have certain employee rights under state and federal law and may be entitled to unpaid wages, interest, attorneys’ fees and costs, and/or be entitled to compensation as a part of the class action lawsuit. Please contact us to speak with one of our experienced lawyers for a free consultation.


Phone: 213.474.3800
Fax: 213.471.4160